Ushenge

The community at Ushenge is not a settlement in the traditional sense. The great henge for which the area is named has stood for many thousands of years (although the ley-lines upon which it was constructed has long since vanished) and there is always a smattering of loosely packed tents and huts at the area. The area does not hold any special significance to the primal spirits or their worshippers either, preferring as they do less permanent shrines. Yet, still people from the wilds around make the pilgrimage to the site at least once in their lives, if not more often.

Someone who had never visisted Ushenge may then wonder what would cause druids, shamans and others to visit the site and hold it in such reverence. Those who have been say it would be impossible to truly understand unless you had seen it. Simply, the henge’s location, atop the tallest hill for many miles around, offers an unparralled vista across the wilds, woodlands and marshes that surround Ushenge. The area is held in high in the beliefs and traditions of the (seemingly primative) people that live in those wilds and to them it is only natural that Ushenge, lying as it does near the centre of those lands and offering such spectacular views of them, would gain a special significance.

There are many tribes and peoples in the lands of Us but none, by unspoken treaty, may claim Ushenge as their own. Occasionally some barbarian king or druid may try and wars break out. It is said that one such druid, Beltor of the Tero peoples, believes the ley-lines can be realigned and power can surge forth once again through the henge. Many follow him but equal numbers oppose his beliefs. Chief amongst them is the leader of the Kantolos tribe, one of the largest, living in Usmarsh. At the moment there is simply disagreement but some fear war may occur soon.

Ushenge

Voyages Beyond Lezta